Category: "Home Computers"

IBM 5150

International Business Machines put their cards on the personal computer future with the IBM 5150 computer. This was a machine designed for business as well as personal use. It had not been too long before that IBM had been selling computers that bore a price tag into the millions of dollars. The IBM 5150 was […]

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Franklin Ace 1000

The Franklin Ace 1000 was a result of the popularity of Apple computers. It was a clone that was so close to the original Apple computer that Apple sued Franklin and won in court. Some say it was not just the design that Franklin copied, but the software as well, even down to the copyright. […]

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Astral 2000

This is a machine that you won’t see very often.  It’s the Astral 2000. It was first mentioned in the May 1976 issue of the Homebrew Computer Club newsletter and first advertised in the November issue of Byte magazine.  It was manufactured by M & R Enterprises and designed completely by members of the Homebrew […]

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Sinclair ZX80

A now rare computer from the 80s came out under the name of Sinclair ZX80. Even though it was not overly popular, some say this was the computer that started the personal computer revolution in the United Kingdom. It was created by Sinclair Research and was a futuristic design for its day. It looked like a […]

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Apple IIe

Apple was one of the first manufacturers of personal computers. The Apple IIe was so early in the computing game that some call it the “original personal computer”. The later 5150 from IBM is said to have copied some of the aspects of the Apple IIe. Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak were the ones who […]

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Heathkit H89

The Heath Company of Benton Harbor, Michigan founded in 1912 by Edward Bayard Heath became early pioneers in the electronics industry. They created a line of products known as Heathkits, these allowed electronic enthusiasts to purchase a kit version of an electronic product and build an equivalent home assembled version for a fraction of the […]

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Rockwell AIM 65

The Rockwell AIM 65 was a development computer introduced to the market back in 1976. The AIM acronym stood for Advanced Interactive Microcomputer and the 65 denoted the first two numbers of the 6502 MOS Technology microprocessor that the Rockwell AIM 65 was based upon. Rockwell were well known for their defense contracts in helping […]

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Tandy TRS-80 Model 4

Near the end of the TRS-80 product run came the Tandy TRS-80 Model 4 from Tandy / Radio Shack. Introduced in 1983, it was an upgrade from the Model 3 in that it ran at a blazing 4 MHz using a Zilog Z80 processor and had a display of 80 columns by 24 lines.  The […]

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Hewlett Packard HP-85

Released in January of 1980 at a retail price of $3250.00, the HP-85 personal computer was a self-contained system, designed to be portable for the small computer user or the technical professional. The HP-85 resembles the IBM 5100 physically and was based on Hewlett Packard’s 8-bit microprocessor technology. The system contained an alphanumeric keyboard, Onboard […]

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Rare Apple 1 Computer Up For Auction

One of the more iconic machines in computing history is headed for the auction block soon. On October 9th, 2012 Christie’s will be including an Apple 1 in its sale.  Only around 200 Apple 1’s were designed and hand built by Steve Wozniak, partner of Steve Jobs at Apple, and probably fewer than fifty are […]

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